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Why Your Body Needs Carbohydrates

 

 

 

Carbohydrates have a bad wrap of late . If you eat any , you will gain weight and feel bloated. Especially if you eat them after 6pm ( timing makes no difference) . Like any macronutrient. If consumed in a abundance you will gain weight but far to many people will cut them drastically or out all together whilst trying to lose weight but you body requires some to function properly both physically and mentally. Even more so if you are active.

Complex carbs provide the energy that fuels muscle contractions. Once eaten, carbohydrates break down into smaller sugars that get absorbed and used as energy. Any glucose not needed right away gets stored in the muscles and the liver in the form of glycogen. Once these glycogen stores are filled up, any extra gets stored as fat.

Glycogen is the source of energy most often used for exercise. It is needed for any short, intense bouts of exercise from sprinting to weightlifting because it is immediately accessible. Glycogen also supplies energy during the first few minutes of any sport. During long, slow duration exercise, fat can help fuel activity, but glycogen is still needed to help break down the fat into something the muscles can use.

Adequate carbohydrate intake also helps prevent protein from being used as energy. If the body doesn’t have enough carbohydrate, protein is broken down to make glucose for energy.

Because the primary role of protein is as the building blocks for muscles, bone, skin, hair, and other tissues, relying on protein for energy (by failing to take in adequate carbohydrate) can limit your ability to build and maintain tissues.

Stored Carbohydrates

One gram of carbohydrate provides four calories of energy. Athletes often talk about carbohydrate loading and carbohydrate depletion which refers to the amount of carbohydrate energy we can store in our muscles.

If we don’t replenish these stores, we can run out of fuel for immediate exercise. Athletes often refer to this as ” hitting the wall.” In the same way, eating large amounts of carbohydrates can increase these stores. This is often referred to as carbohydrate loading or carbo-loading. While every person is unique, and our carbohydrate storage capacity will vary.

2018-04-18T11:39:42+00:00 March 28th, 2018|